graubert

Graubart Awarded NEH Fellowship

1 February 2017 | Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Karen Graubart has been awarded a prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) fellowship for her latest book project, tentatively titled “Republics of Difference: Religious and Racial Self-Governance in the Iberian Atlantic, 1400–1650.”

Previously supported by Kellogg Institute research funding, Graubart’s project examines how legal jurisdiction shaped the formation of ethnic and racial classification across the Iberian empire.

Michael

Faculty Fellow Research Reveals New Drug Regimen to Eliminate Elephantiasis

30 January 2017 | Gene Stowe

A collaborative modeling study among three research groups, including Faculty Fellow Edwin Michael’s laboratory in the Department of Biological Sciences, reveals that a triple-drug regimen could accelerate the elimination of lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease also known as elephantiasis.

Kaboski

Faculty Fellow Helps Guide Armenia’s Economic Policy

11 January 2017 | Marshall V. King

Faculty Fellow Joseph Kaboski’s work in Armenia started with an email from the developing country, one of those you might usually delete.

But the economist responded—and he’s now become a trusted adviser to the Central Bank of Armenia, helping with research to guide the Eurasian nation’s economic policy.

“It’s always nice to have your research matter,” said Kaboski, the David F. and Erin M. Seng Foundation Professor of Economics in the College of Arts and Letters.

cassel

Faculty Fellow Doug Cassel to Join Colombian President at Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony

8 December 2016 | Shannon Roddel

Kellogg Faculty Fellow Doug Cassel will join Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos at the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize ceremony on Saturday, December 10 in Oslo, Norway. Santos will receive his prize from the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee in the presence of King Harald V of Norway.

Carozza Appointed to the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences by Pope Francis

9 August 2016 | Michael Garvey

Kellogg Institute Director Paolo G. Carozza, professor of law and concurrent professor of political science, has been appointed to the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences by Pope Francis.

Rethinking the Delivery of Development Aid

28 June 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

Over the past several years, the Kellogg Institute has partnered with scholars, practitioners, and the global health pioneer Partners In Health (PIH) to consider how the notion of “accompaniment” might inform—and even transform—the practice of international development and aid delivery.

Noble Takes Part in US-China Consultation on People-to-People Exchange

14 June 2016 | Sue Lister and Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Jonathan Noble recently spoke in Beijing at the 7th annual US-China Consultation on People-to-People Exchange (CPE), a conference to promote and strengthen ties between the United States and China in the fields of education, culture, health, science and technology, sports, and women’s issues. This year’s CPE was cochaired by US Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong.

Faculty Fellow Jonathan Noble recently spoke in Beijing at the 7th annual US-China Consultation on People-to-People Exchange (CPE), a conference to promote and strengthen ties between the United States and China in the fields of education, culture, health, science and technology, sports, and women’s issues. This year’s CPE was cochaired by US Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong.

Faculty Fellow George Lopez to Judge New $100 Million MacArthur Competition

6 June 2016 |

Faculty Fellow George A. Lopez has been named to serve as an evaluating judge for a newly launched competition that will award a $100 million grant to a single proposal designed to help solve a critical problem affecting people, places, or the planet.

Mainwaring Receives Undergraduate Mentoring Award

1 June 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

Long-time Faculty Fellow Scott Mainwaring, the Eugene P. and Helen Conley Professor of Political Science, is the recipient of the Kellogg Institute’s 2016 Undergraduate Mentoring Award, which recognizes one faculty fellow each year for excellence in mentoring undergraduate student research.

Selected from nominations made by students, the honor is presented to a faculty member who has demonstrated an exceptional commitment to advising undergraduates in the Institute’s undergraduate programs.

Pelton Receives Honorary Doctorate

4 May 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Rev. Robert Pelton, CSC, has received an honorary doctorate from the University of Portland in recognition of his exemplary career as a “noted filmmaker, scholar, author, theology professor, and globetrotter” and lifelong commitment of service to Latin America and the Latin American Church.

Faculty Fellow Rev. Robert Pelton, CSC, has received an honorary doctorate from the University of Portland in recognition of his exemplary career as a “noted filmmaker, scholar, author, theology professor, and globetrotter” and lifelong commitment of service to Latin America and the Latin American Church.

UN Expert Visits Kellogg to Discuss International Right to Solidarity

21 April 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

During her visit to the Institute last month, the Kellogg Institute community had the opportunity to engage on several levels with Virginia Dandan, the UN Human Rights Council’s independent expert on human rights and international solidarity.

Based in Geneva, Dandan holds a mandate from the UN Human Rights Council to draft and present to the UN a declaration of the international right to solidarity.

Christopher Ball

Faculty Fellow Wins ACLS Fellowship to Conduct Research in Brazil

14 April 2016 | Brian Wallheimer and Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Christopher Ball has won a 2016 American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowship that will allow him to study the local history and culture of an indigenous tribe in Brazil through connections between the local language and nearby rivers.

A linguistic and cultural anthropologist, Ball will spend time next year on and around the Xingu River in northern Brazil with the Wauja, an indigenous tribe that lives in a protected part of the rainforest.

“What do I have to do to get an A?”—New Book Explores How College Students Learn

7 April 2016 | Sarah Neuberger

In a new book, I Love Learning; I Hate School: An Anthropology of College (Cornell University Press, 2016), Faculty Fellow Susan D. Blum explores a conundrum: why students who love to learn may still find their educational experiences difficult and unsatisfying.

In a new book, I Love Learning; I Hate School: An Anthropology of College (Cornell University Press, 2016), Faculty Fellow Susan D. Blum explores a conundrum: why students who love to learn may still find their educational experiences difficult and unsatisfying.

Nicaragua Canal

DC Workshop Explores Impact of Proposed Nicaraguan Canal

23 March 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

Environmental and legal experts gathered at George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC, on Friday, March 18 to discuss the implications of a new transoceanic canal that Nicaragua proposes to build in an agreement with a Chinese investor.

Geography Key to Maintaining Peace after Civil Conflict, Daly Finds

17 March 2016 | Sarah Neuberger

In her new book, Faculty Fellow Sarah Zukerman Daly analyzes the trajectories of armed groups following peace accords, using Colombia as her central case study.

In her new book, Faculty Fellow Sarah Zukerman Daly analyzes the trajectories of armed groups following peace accords, using Colombia as her central case study.

New Report Analyzes Role of Gender in Latino Savings and Retirement

26 February 2016 | William G. Gilroy

new report from the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies (ILS) examines how gender affects Latino men’s and women’s savings for retirement and concludes that there is a need to develop programs to empower lower-income women and men to save for retirement.

A Wager for Peace: Faculty Fellow Doug Cassel Assists with Negotiations in Colombia

17 February 2016 | Brendan O’Shaugnessy

Peace negotiations between the Colombian government and the country’s principal leftist guerillas had come to a standstill yet again. One of the longest and bloodiest civil wars in modern history hung in the balance. A month earlier, the rebels had killed 11 soldiers at an army camp. The government retaliated, killing more than 20 guerillas, who ended their unilateral ceasefire.

High Stakes in Pope’s Visit to Mexico, Says Casarella

9 February 2016 | Michael O. Garvey

Faculty Fellow Peter Casarella predicts the pontiff’s first trip to Mexico will be “historic encounter.”

Faculty Fellow Peter Casarella predicts the pontiff’s first trip to Mexico will be “historic encounter.”

Exemplary Mentoring Boosts Undergraduate Scholarship

1 February 2016 | Mary Hendriksen

Faculty Fellow Paul Ocobock, a historian of 20th-century Africa, and International Scholar Bright Gyamfi ’16 understand very well the demands and rewards of good mentoring.

Faculty Fellow Paul Ocobock, a historian of 20th-century Africa, and International Scholar Bright Gyamfi ’16 understand very well the demands and rewards of good mentoring.

Graubart Wins Prestigious Robertson Prize

28 January 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow Karen Graubart has received the 2015 James Alexander Robertson Prize for her article "Learning from the Qadi: The Jurisdiction of Local Rule in the Early Colonial Andes," Hispanic American Historical Review 95, 2 (2015).

Anthropologist’s Research Impacts Refugee Policy in Kenya

27 January 2016 | Carol Bradley

In 2014, Raouf Mazou, the representative in Kenya for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, invited Faculty Fellow Rahul Oka, an economic anthropologist and the Ford Family Assistant Professor of Anthropology, to speak at a workshop on refugee issues.

“Representatives were there from the World Bank, UNDP (United Nations Development Program), UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund)—all the acronyms were there,” Oka said.

Varieties of Democracy Dataset Released to Public

4 January 2016 | Elizabeth Rankin

In a milestone for the study of democracy, the complete Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) dataset, covering some 15 million data points across 173 countries from 1900 to the present, has been made public for use by researchers and citizens around the world.

The largest and most comprehensive dataset of its kind, it enables for the first time a vast research agenda on hundreds of aspects of democracy as well as nuanced descriptive analyses that are comparable across time and space.

New Book Shows Impact of Education on Political Participation in Mali

3 December 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

In a new book, Education and Empowered Citizenship in Mali (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015), Faculty Fellow Jaimie Bleck explores the relationship between schooling, political knowledge, and political participation in Mali, where access to education nearly tripled in the two decades following the country’s 1991 transition to multiparty democracy.

Pérez-Liñán Named Editor-in-Chief of LARR

29 October 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

Kellogg Distinguished Research Affiliate Aníbal Pérez-Liñán has been named editor-in-chief of Latin American Research Review (LARR), the official scholarly journal of the Latin American Studies Association. He will assume the position on January 1 and supervise issues published after 2016.

Faculty Fellow Casarella on Pope Francis’ Message to Latin America

29 October 2015 | Michael O. Garvey

Pope Francis’ July 5–13 journey to South America takes him through countries and among people who already knew him well before he became the leader of all the world’s Catholics, according to Faculty Fellow Peter J. Casarella.

Trejo Article Recognized by American Sociological Association

15 October 2015 | Emily Beaudoin

Political scientist Guillermo Trejo, a Kellogg faculty fellow, has received an honorable mention for best article published in 2014 from the Collective Behavior and Social Movements Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

Carozza Speaks at United Nations

8 October 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

The persistence of hunger, poverty, and extreme inequality in an increasingly wealthy world is the great paradox of our time, said the organizers of an “Ethics for Development” event held at the United Nations in New York on Monday. Kellogg Institute Director Paolo Carozza represented academia on a panel that included speakers from government, civil society, and the UN itself.

Faculty Fellow Cassel Praises Colombia Peace Accord

23 September 2015 | Michael O. Garvey

The agreement announced in Havana Wednesday, September 2, between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) could bring to an end that country’s 51-year war. The parties have now committed to an immediate, bilateral cease-fire and to sign a final peace agreement within six months; the FARC have committed to disarm within 60 days thereafter; and both sides have agreed to provisions on justice for war crimes.

Through a Sociologist’s Lens: Democracy and Development in Brazil

22 September 2015 | Mary Hendriksen

Kellogg Faculty Fellow Ann Mische (PhD, New School for Social Research), a scholar of social movements in Brazil and around the world, has an intense interest in how citizens in a democracy debate their futures and engage in collective efforts to bring about social and political change.

LANACC Book Launch to Celebrate New Volume on Archbishop Romero

9 September 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

A new book examining the life and work of recently beatified Archbishop Óscar Romero of El Salvador will be launched with a panel discussion and reception on Thursday, September 17 at 4 pm in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies Auditorium. Hosted by Latin American/North American Church Concerns (LANACC), the event is free and open to the public.

Cassel to Support Colombian Peace Process on New Working Group

31 July 2015 | Kevin Fye

Kellogg Faculty Fellow Douglass Cassel has been named by the Colombian government to a high-level bilateral working group (subcomisión) on justice.

With the resumption of talks between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) to establish a stable peace process, the working group is tasked with designing recommendations to streamline and support the negotiations.

Celebrating the Spiritual Leadership of Archbishop Romero

24 July 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

Less than a month after the beatification of Archbishop Óscar Romero before jubilant crowds in San Salvador, a new volume edited by Faculty Fellow Rev. Robert Pelton, CSC, offers a fresh look at the remarkable pastoral leader long known as “San Romero de America,” who promised just weeks before he was assassinated in 1980 that he would rise again in the Salvadoran people.

The Paradox of Technological Change in 19th-Century Mexico

21 July 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

In his new book, Technology and the Search for Progress in Modern Mexico (University of California Press, 2015), Faculty Fellow Edward (Ted) Beatty examines technological change in Mexico in the late 1900s, finding that new, imported technologies supported economic growth and brought cultural change and social dislocation but did not stimulate the expansion of domestic innovation and invention.

Téllez Recording of Sacred Music Reissued in Mexico

16 July 2015 |

The Tempus Clasico label, specializing in masterpieces of the Latin American repertoire, has reissued a recording by Kellogg Faculty Fellow Carmen-Helena Téllez of Stabat Mater and other works of sacred music by the well-known composer Mario Lavista. The original recording was produced by Indiana University’s Latin American Music Center in 2012.

Democratization the Focus of Two Scholarly Gatherings

9 July 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

Democracy in Brazil and the phenomenon of “authoritarian successor parties” around the world were the focus of two dynamic Kellogg gatherings of social scientists co-organized by Faculty Fellow Scott Mainwaring in spring 2015. Held back-to-back in April, each drew what one participant called “a virtual who’s who” of scholars in the field.

Faculty Fellow Casarella on Pope Francis’ Message to Latin America

6 July 2015 | Michael O. Garvey

Pope Francis’ July 5–13 journey to South America takes him through countries and among people who already knew him well before he became the leader of all the world’s Catholics, according to Faculty Fellow Peter J. Casarella.

Course Prepares Undergrads for International Field Research

20 May 2015 | Josh Weinhold

International Scholar and International Development Studies (IDS) minor Jackie Bruns '17, who spent summer 2014 in Nicaragua on a Kellogg summer internship, walked into class knowing she wanted to do an international research project. It was just a vague idea, though, perhaps something on Central America and businesses solving poverty issues.

New Frontiers Series Brings Development Economists to Notre Dame

15 April 2015 | Elizabeth Rankin

Five leading development economists are spending time at Notre Dame this spring as part of the ongoing series "New Frontiers in Economic Development" sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies in collaboration with the Department of Economics

Cassel Awarded Fulbright Fellowship

17 February 2015 | Chuck Williams

Kellogg Faculty Fellow and international human rights law scholar Douglass Cassel has been awarded a Fulbright fellowship to do research in Mexico on the enforcement of inter-American human rights law by Mexican courts. The project will begin in the spring semester of 2016.

Victoria Hui Testifies before Congress on Future of Democracy in Hong Kong

21 November 2014 | William G. Gilroy, Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Victoria Hui testified Thursday, November 20, before the Congressional Executive Commission on China hearing "The Future of Democracy in Hong Kong."

Sarah Ann Wells Explores the Dialogue Between South American Literature and Media

13 November 2014 | Carrie Gates

Faculty Fellow Sarah Ann Wells, assistant professor of Portuguese and Spanish in Notre Dame's Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, has long been fascinated by film and media studies and by the modernist period.

Implications of Dignity for International Development Explored at Rome Conference

24 October 2014 | Elizabeth Rankin

The University of Notre Dame's Kellogg Institute for International Studies has launched a major new project examining the role of human dignity in the work of international human development by bringing together 25 leading development practitioners and scholars fro

Hong Kong Movement Unlike Any Other, Says Hui

1 October 2014 | Shannon Chapla

Hong Kong marked China's National Day (Oct. 1) in unprecedented fashion, as pro-democracy protesters crowded the streets of the Asian financial hub for what is being called a critical day in the territorys' "Umbrella Revolution."

Kellogg faculty fellow and Hong Kong native Victoria Hui, a political scientist, has worked in the democracy movement there.

Father Gutiérrez to Receive 2014 Gittler Prize

10 September 2014 | Michael O. Garvey

Faculty Fellow Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, OP, John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, will receive the 2014 Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Prize from Brandeis University.

Award-winning Mainwaring Book Offers New Theory on Democratization in Latin America

27 August 2014 | Elizabeth Rankin

A new book coauthored by Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow Scott Mainwaring and former Visiting Fellow Aníbal Pérez-Liñán

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Kellogg Fellows Highlight Sustainable Housing Solutions for Haiti

20 August 2014 | William G. Gilroy

Video

The attention and concern of the world was focused on Haiti following its Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake. As is often the case, as time went on, the focus on Haiti became less intense as the world moved on.

Ricardo Lagos to Deliver Inaugural Guillermo O’Donnell Memorial Lecture

2 June 2014 | Elizabeth Rankin

Former President of Chile Ricardo Lagos will deliver the first annual lecture established in honor of Guillermo O’Donnell, who served as founding director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies.  The Institute will serve as host of the inaugural lecture.

One of Latin America’s most prominent political scientists, O’Donnell was known for his visionary work on the nature of the region’s authoritarian regimes, the dynamics of transitions from authoritarian rule, and on the imperative to improve the quality of new democracies.

Kellogg Launches New Book by Dr. Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutiérrez

21 November 2013 | Elizabeth Rankin

Elizabeth Rankin • November 21, 2013

“Both healers, doctors of body and soul,” University President Rev. John Jenkins, CSC said of pioneer in global health Dr. Paul Farmer and path-breaking liberation theologian Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, OP, a Kellogg faculty fellow, at the launch of their new book on November 19.

Faculty Fellow Michael Coppedge

Varieties of Democracy Project to Receive $ 5.8 Million

31 October 2013 | Elizabeth Rankin

Elizabeth Rankin • October 31, 201

An ambitious international research effort to illuminate why democracies around the world succeed or fail has been awarded approximately $5.8 million (37.5 million SEK) over six years by the Swedish foundation Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (RJ).

Collaborative Effort Brings Leading Development Economists to Notre Dame

13 February 2013 | Elizabeth Rankin

Five of the world’s preeminent development economists are visiting Notre Dame this spring as part of the series “New Frontiers in Economic Development,” sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies in collaboration with the Department of Economics.

Oka Investigates Informal Trading in Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp

9 November 2012 | Carol C. Bradley

The 90,000-person Kakuma Refugee Camp, in the Turkana District in northwest Kenya, has grown into the equivalent of a permanent city—with the same level of inequity, violence and informal (black market) economic systems as urban slums, says Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow Rahul Oka, Ford Family Assistant Professor of anthropology and concurrent assistant professor in African and African American Studies.

Bleck Wins African Politics Best Dissertation Award

5 September 2012 | Elizabeth Rankin

Faculty Fellow Jaimie Bleck has won the 2011 Lynne Rienner Award for Best Dissertation in African Politics from the American Political Science Association’s Africa Politics Conference Group (APCG). Sponsored by the publisher Lynne Rienner, the award carries a $500 prize.

Bleck’s award-winning work, “Schooling Citizens: Education, Citizenship, and Democracy in Mali,” explores the political effect of education in the West African country.

Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutiérrez Take Part in Campus Dialogue

26 October 2011 | Elizabeth Rankin

Elizabeth Rankin - October 26, 2011

When Dr. Paul Farmer came to campus in April to accept the Notre Dame Award for International Human Development and Solidarity on behalf of the global health organization he cofounded 25 years ago, he was profoundly moved by the opportunity to talk to a member of the Notre Dame community who has deeply inspired his mission to bring high-quality health care to the very poor.